Kitchen Garden.

My daughter in love who is the boss of the garden at home had gone off to her mother’s place to mother-sit her mother recovering from a minor ailment. Her assistant and companion Mangal who is more or less the second in command at home also was absent shifting residence and I had a brilliant idea of having pudina (mint) chutney for lunch. The other help Shweta was duly deputed to purchase a bunch of mint leaves from the market and fortunately, the bunch remained unground due to a series of unplanned for developments.

Today, both the ladies are back on duty and when I requested that the chutney be made, I had the mortification of being informed of my ignorance of the mint leaves growing in our own garden.
This is the patch in which both betel leaves and mint leaves are grown. I had known about the former in the garden as I have a few every day after lunch. I was blissfully ignorant of the latter also being grown in the patch.

The DIL got the garden mint leaves to show me when I was amazed at the size of the leaves. I promptly got the market bought leaves out from the fridge and you can see the difference. The home grown ones are on the left.
Mint chutney to my liking cannot be made without a generous addition of green chillies and lo and behold I was informed that they too are grown in our garden.
Rummuser is mighty pleased that he can now have his favourite chutney whenever he wants by just accessing the major ingredients from his own garden!

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11 Responses to Kitchen Garden.

  1. Wisewebwoman says:

    Wow, amazing indeed not knowing what was growing in your very own garden!

    Enjoy the chutney, it sounds to die.

    XO
    WWW

  2. It’s time you got out of your sofa and explored your ecosystem… Otherwise you may never even know what is under the flight of the staircase which is hop, skip and jump… That you can’t do anyway from your comfort zone sofa😁

  3. Ursula says:

    This is where we go wrong. Instead of looking down our own nose we seek out the lenghts of others. (I made that up – but it holds water).

    Back to your mint, in the motherland’s words “Warum in die Ferne schweifen, wenn das Gute liegt so nah?”. Trust me – when you know how to pronounce it it sounds divine.

    Loosely translated: “Why look beyond the horizon when the good can be found on your doorstep?”. There you go, Ramana, and our long time, and distance, betrothal.

    U

  4. tammy j says:

    the best iced tea I’ve ever enjoyed was in Eureka Springs Arkansas.
    apparently the café owner had his own garden and used fresh mint leaves in it.
    a slice of orange and lime were also added. and of course the ice. it was simply delightful and most refreshing. (I don’t sugar my tea. which is practically unheard of in the South.)
    the wonders in your very own garden! LOL.
    do you choose what you’ll have for lunch or dinner or is it a surprise each day by the women who work for you? I would dearly love to be surprised each day myself!

    • The mint tea that you describe is also quite popular in some homes here. I have had a number of cups even made at our home. It is delicious and very bracing.

      Normally, I am surprised but, I am asked now and then when the ladies do not have any ideas for the day’s menu. It is always for lunch as I do not have dinner and I make my own breakfast while the rest of the household is still asleep.

  5. well I’m not surprised you didn’t know what was in your kitchen garden, I would make a suggestion that was much has been added since your DIL has arrived…and so what if you don’t what’s out there. Stay on your couch…it’s okay.
    Catherine de Seton recently posted..Why can’t people read!

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