Relocating.

My fellow 2 on 1 Friday blogger Shackman has recently relocated to California and I was inspired to suggest this topic by that move. Please go over to Shackman’s blog to see how he tackles the topic.

My pre-marriage and the first year after that was life living out of a suitcase from the age of 16 for me. I had relocated a few times between Hyderabd and Chennai/Mumbai and also Ahmedabad before my marriage in November 1968. Relocating was simply a matter of packing my suitcase and moving to a hotel, hostel or paying guest accommodation and did not make for much effort or difficulty.

The first home we set up after marriage was in Delhi and since it was for a stay of just a few months, we had taken a barsati on rent and hired furniture and bare minimum utensils and a stove but both of us lived off suitcases.

The first proper home that we lived in was in Mumbai between 1970 and mid 1973 when we acquired furniture, cooking utensils, linen, etc and when we had to move to Kolkata, we were exposed for the first time to relocating with major packing, discarding etc but, the redeeming feature of the exercise was that we could hire professional packers and movers who did the dirty work, stored the stuff till we found accommodation at Kolkata and unpacked for us too.

From that first move, we relocated to Kerala, back to Mumbai on three occasions, Delhi and Bengaluru and finally to Pune in 1990 where we bought our home where I continue to live till date. During these relocations we moved and set up new homes on eight separate occasions till we put in our final roots.

I had to relocate on two separate occasions afterwards to Tirupur but since it was to furnished accommodation on both occasions I simply had to pack a suitcase. Whenever Urmeela came to stay with me there, she too simply had to come with a packed suitcase. So those two relocations were not really relocations in the true sense.

The only major disruption that we experienced during the relocations was in the schooling of our son Ranjan which, we once even had to solve by admitting him to a boarding school for three years. In retrospect, those three years were also the most disturbing for both of us despite frequent meetings with him at his school as well as his coming home for his vacations. Another experience that I would not wish on anyone.

I can therefore confidently assert that I am a seasoned and well-experienced relocator. I would not like to do that again though as I am now too well ensconced in my comfort zone in Pune where it will be three decades next year, since we relocated.

Absence.

If only she would allow me to photograph her when she looks like this, I would have taken a photograph of Chutki to show how much she misses Ranjan. This is exactly the expression that she has more or less constantly and no amount of cheering her up by Manjiree or me would change that. She is listless in ‘his’ absence.

Ranjan has gone to Bengaluru for a few days and till he returns on Tuesday afternoon, she is  unlikely to change her expression.

I suppose that if someone took my photograph now, I too will have a hangdog expression like that because, I too miss him. When he is here, I hardly get to talk to him as, he is busy with his own affairs but, I simply miss his presence in the house.

The less said the better about Manjiree. She too is moping around as though the heat is not enough to depress us.

All three of us are missing him. I shall post a photograph of Chutki after his return to show what a difference it makes to her life when he is around.

Idiot!

Readers of my blog posts know that I am blessed with regular experiences of synchronicity. Here is another experience.

Two days ago, I received a phone call from a friend who had emigrated to Australia and has just returned to India for a visit. Through another mutual friend he got my phone number and called me and chatted for about fifteen minutes.

The rest of the conversation is unimportant for this post but the one about my marriage is. He and his wife were regular visitors to our home before they emigrated as were we to their home in Bengaluru. On being informed that Urmeela had died nine years ago, he was quite taken aback and reminded me of how funny she could be about her relationship with me. He asked me how I had coped with the loss and on being told that I am now quite comfortable in my single status he suggested that I get married to myself. I thought that he was joking and let it pass. He subsequently sent me this quote from Douglas Adams through WhatsApp.  A measure of the liberties that old friends can take with each other.

Earlier this afternoon I got a reference to a BBC programme on Self Marriage and I was stumped at the coincidence. I called up my friend and asked him if this is what he had meant. He promptly confirmed that this is what he meant and that he was not being facetious. I immediately thought of sharing this with my readers.

Wonders will not cease will they?  I would rather be an idiot than go through the self marriage experience. There are other singles among my readers whose opinion I seek through this post.

Blue Collar Vs White Collar.

It has not yet come to Vs in India. It is still peaceful coexistence, albeit with a subtext of unease.

The Blue Collar population striving hard to get its children move up the social and economic ladder by sending them to good schools/colleges etc and to a large extent succeeding. On the other hand, what I would call a Green Collar population, predominantly rural and agriculture oriented, strives hard to send part of its numbers into cities into Blue Collar occupations and succeeding at that too.

That leaves us with the White Collar which aspires to just keep up with the better off neighbours! In other words, wealth.

There is however a new category called Knowledge Workers which mostly does not wear collars at all and is totally outside the ambit of fashion. This category is the latest kid on the block and has created quite a stir in some of our cities like Bengaluru, Pune and Hyderabad where our Information Technology companies tend to concentrate.

All three are interdependent and feed off each other quite peacefully.  And Hambone explains the economic reality beautifully in this cartoon.

 

There is however the looming danger of automation which will increasingly affect all three categories. Beyond that, the scenario is even more startling as depicted so starkly by Yuval Noah Harari in his amazing book Homo Deus. From where we stand, he says, in the accelerating present, no long-term future is imaginable, still less predictable – and there is plenty of time for questions. In that book he suggests a future for human beings that will be more like the Gods of yore than humans of now! I leave my readers to either read the book or research on their own.

Shackman has suggested this week’s LBC topic. You can see what the other writers of the LBC have to say in their respective blogs.  Maria, Pravin, Ashok and Shackman.

Theresa May In Temple.

Visiting Prime Minister of Britain, Theresa May visited Bengaluru’s famous

Someshwar temple yesterday.

What was most appealing to me was her wearing a sari to undertake the visit.

Prime Minister Theresa May visits the Sri Someshwara Hindu temple in Bangalore on the final day of a three-day trade mission designed to pave the way for close commercial links with the south Asian giant after Brexit.
Prime Minister Theresa May visits the Sri Someshwara Hindu temple in Bengaluru on the final day of a three-day trade mission designed to pave the way for close commercial links with the south Asian giant after Brexit.

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