Books Vs E-Readers.

I thank Nick for the above image which hits the nail right on its head for him and me.

For me, it is not Books Vs E-readers but, Books AND E-readers. This post is to explain why.

My Kindle E-Reader was registered with Amazon India on July 18, 2013. Currently, I have 33 books loaded and waiting to be read on it and, I have archived 306 books that I have read on it.

This is a book shelf in my bedroom which contains all the books that I keep referring to on and off. Most of them are on Philosophy and religion with a few on history.
This is the library on the upstairs landing where all the books that I have read but which may need revisiting are kept. A few years ago, I had got rid of a couple of hundred books by donating to a good cause which enabled the fund raisers to get some badly needed cash for their NGO work. Despite that reduction and most purchases now being done for my Kindle, the shelf is already groaning.

Neither of these shelves contains any fiction. All the fiction is on my Kindle.

I also get six newspapers every day and six periodicals to read spread over each month.

I read a lot.

My first preference is the Kindle as I can adjust the font to be comfortable. I find that most hard copies of books nowadays use small print to minimise the total number of pages and that is very irritating. I buy hard copies only when the price is very much cheaper than the kindle version is the latter is available.

This is my take on this week’s Friday 4 On 1 blog posts where Conrad, Sanjana, Shackman and I write on the same topic. Today’s topic has been suggested by Shackman. Please do go over to the other two blogs to see what they have to say on the same topic. Thank you.

Another New Word.

A dear friend Arun, who has featured in this blog before too, decided to introduce me to another word following an exchange of messages on WhatsApp on the subject of some books.
I am not abibliopobic, at least not yet and my tomorrow’s post will amply support my contention.

It is however fascinating to come across English words that resonates with one due to its proximity to his habits. I am sure that others who comment on my blog about new words will find this word to be fascinating too.

Birds.

My most enjoyable time every day is the half an hour or so that I spend having my morning mug of tea while watching the flowers, butterflies and birds that visit our garden. This has been so ever since we moved into this home over thirty one years ago when in fact, the bird population was as large as it is now thanks to the lockdown and absence of traffic and humans on our roads.

I have recently been unable to name some of the birds that I see in the mornings and remembered that for the same reason, I had bought a book thirty years ago and I went searching for it in my library a few days ago. I couldn’t find it and then I remembered that I had given it away some years ago to someone else with the same problem. I could not recollect that person’s name, a sure sign of my not being a spring-chicken any more.

I therefore, sent for another copy and it arrived this morning.

This book reminded me of Salim Ali, its author and my visit to SACON, which was on the way to ArshaVidya Gurukulam that I used to visit during 1999 and 2001.

I have already identified two birds that I could not name and am yet to find two more. I am sure that I will find them sooner than later.

I find birds and butterflies fascinating.  Do you?

Philosophy And What It Means To Me.

“Philosophy is the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when considered as an academic discipline.”

Despite having written before about my tryst with philosophy  in my blog, it is still nice to be able to revisit my story from a different perch as it were.

I approach the topic with a historic perspective highly personal in nature as, I am deeply involved in the study of philosophy.  I was not always so and hence this approach.

I was burning both ends of the candle in the late seventies of the last century when a dear friend, concerned about my well being put me in touch with Transcendental Meditation. I learnt it and started practicing it in earnest with amazing results. While practicing, I also studied the first six chapters of the Bhagwat Gita translated and commented on by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

This continued till 1983 when on a dare, I attended a ten day Vipassana camp and got hooked to that form of meditation which I continue to practice till today.  That little adventure also led me to study Buddhist philosophy.

Two  more synchronistic developments that led to further incidents that got me thoroughly involved in Indian philosophy.

While on a business visit to Chennai, another dear friend insisted that I accompany him to a lecture on Vedanta by Swami Paramarthananda. That got me further interested and when the same friend on a visit to Pune requested me to take him to a colleague and fellow Sanyasi of the Chennai Swamiji, I did and met Swami Satswarupananda of Pune.

I not only met him, but became his student and studied Vedanta under him in our Guru Shishya Parampara for fifteen years.

He finally retired to full time sanyasa to Rishikesh after instructing his students in Pune that Shravanam. (Learning) and Mananam (Internalising the learning) were over and the time had come for them to focus on Nidhidyasanam. And that is what I have been doing since the last many years.

In the meanwhile, I also had the privilege of meeting Swami Dayananda Saraswati, the Guru to both the Swamijis mentioned earlier, both at Anaikatti, his head quarters and in Pune during two of his visits.

Having bored my readers with that background, let me now explain what Vedanta, means to me.

In the Vedantic system, one goes through various stages of life with four goals called the Purushartha.. Having crossed the first three fairly successfully, I am at the last stage of my progress to achieve Moksha.

End of my story.

To understand the contents of my post, please do use the links given for various words without which, it will be difficult to.

This is my take on this week’s Friday 4 On 1 blog posts where Conrad, Sanjana, Shackman and I write on the same topic. Today’s topic has been suggested by Sanjana. Please do go over to the other two blogs to see what they have to say on the same topic. Thank you.

A Special Treat.

My irrepressible daughter in love procured from somewhere a new root vegetable which I had never seen or had before.
She informed me that it is a popular vegetable from Indore which by chance, she found in the market during her foray there and brought for us. It is called Garadu and is so rare that it does not feature in wikipedia or any other source to enable me to give a link to it.

It is essentially a member of the yam family.

I had it roasted and we had it earlier today for lunch.
Needless to say, I over-ate taking the chance of some suffering later in the day but, as I write this, no ill effect has occurred.

I could not resist the temptation to share the news of my lunch with some friends from Indore and they were all surprised that it was available in Pune where we live and complimented me for having had the good taste to have it.  Having tasted it once, I look forward to having it more during the next season which I am told is normally between October and March.  Perhaps what we procured was from a cold storage facility.