Three Friends And Language.

First friend SS sent me this.

Five minutes later I read another message from a different friend KA who sent me this:

For good measure he also added:

“I remembered you when I read this word…

Saying this with respect 🙏 not as a crack…”

Ten minutes later I got this from AB:

Everyone knows I’m a stickler for good spelling. So when an associate e-mailed technical documents asking me to “decifer” them, I had to set him straight.

“Decipher is spelled with a ph, not an f,” I wrote. “In case you’ve forgotten, spell-checker comes free with your Microsoft program.”

A minute later came his reply, “Must be dephective.”

My day started off well and with a smile which subsequently became a grin.

Favorite Time Of The Year.

I am actually surprised that Shackman has suggested this topic for our Friday 2 on 1 weekly blog posts when both of us write on the same topic. To my rough recollection, by now I must have written at least fifteen blog posts on my favourite time of the year in Pune where I live. It is our monsoon season. It is one of our three main seasons, the other two being Summer and winter. Monsoon starts from around mid June and lasts till early October.

The photograph shown above is of one of the many places around Pune during the monsoon when you can see such waterfalls.

The city itself looks like this often

.

Our little garden like this:

Everything looks clean and green and the rivers are in spate that makes it a sight to see and cherish.


During the end of the summer seaon, I start looking forward to the arrival of the monsoon season. I love to sit in our veranda and watch the rain fall in our garden. My son and daughter in love simply love to get out in the rain and get wet and Chutki loves to play in the puddles all around the neighbourhood when she is out on her walks.

I always regret the end of the monsoon season though it brings in our festive season.

Please do go over to Shackman’s blog to see what he has to say about the topic.

Retirement.

As should be obvious, that man could well be me, a retired old geezer solving crossword puzzles to keep himself out of mischief.

Since I started to work when most middle class Indians were still in college, my great ambition was to retire when I was fifty. I was not able to but did retire at the age of 52. At that point of time, I had very valuable assets, a reasonably good pension, money in the bank and most importantly, an empty nest with an independent son having flown the coop.

I was however pulled out of retirement on other occasions on short term assignments but, by and large, even those did no take away my attitude towards life, one of taking it easy and not being ambitious to achieve big goals.

I am now 75 and so when I came across this piece of information it was an Aha moment for me. Just look at this table from the article.
Table 1 – Actuarial Study of life span vs. age at retirement.

And just as I was planning the outline for this post, I came across another very interesting piece of information which is even more interesting. I hope that this young man succeeds and spends many more relaxed years solving crossword puzzles or whatever else that may interest him. I wish that I had had that kind of an environment when I was that age!

Resilence.

I have great admiration and respect for Subroto Bagchi. This blog post of his has just reinforced my feelings towards him. He has taken an ordinary daily occurrence on our streets and created a metaphor that is simply mind blowing for its impact and simplicity.

It inspires me to suggest Resilience as a topic for one of our 2 on 1 posts.

Meditation.

An old Farmer lived on a farm in the mountains with his young grandson. Each morning Grandpa was up early morning and sat for meditation. His grandson wanted to be just like him and tried to imitate him in every way he could.One day the grandson asked, “Grandpa! I try to meditate just like you but thoughts disturb me, and what I do understand I forget as soon as I come out of meditation. What good does meditation do?”
The Grandfather quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and replied, “Take this coal basket down to the river and bring me back a basket of water.”

The boy did as he was told, but all the water leaked out before he got back to the house.

The grandfather laughed and said, “You’ll have to move a little faster next time,” and sent him back to the river with the basket to try again.

This time the boy ran faster, but again the basket was empty before he returned home. Out of breath, he told his grandfather that it was impossible to carry water in a basket, and he went to get a bucket instead.

The old man said, “I don’t want a bucket of water; I want a basket of water. You’re just not trying hard enough,” and he went out the door to watch the boy try again. At this point, the boy knew it was impossible, but he wanted to show his grandfather that even if he ran as fast as he could, the water would leak out before he got back to the house. The boy again dipped the basket into river and ran hard, but when he reached his grandfather the basket was again empty.

Out of breath, he said, “See Grandpa, it’s useless!”

“So you think it is useless?” The old man said, “Look at the basket.”

The boy looked at the basket and for the first time realized that the basket was different. It had been transformed from a dirty old coal basket to now clean, inside and out.

“Son, that’s what happens when you meditate. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you meditate every day, thoughts starts to diminish, like dirty coal basket transformed to clean, in same way you tend to be pure, you will be changed, inside and out. That is the work of Meditation in our lives.

Never give up spiritual practice. By doing spiritual practice daily all heaviness and unnecessary things tend to fall and you start feeling light. This is the indication that you are evolving.
Slowly you will feel peace and calmness within you. Instead of reacting you start responding.”

Disclaimer.  I have simply copy pasted a mail received from a friend.  I am unable to find the source of this story.  I have shared here as the moral of the story resonates with me.