Nostalgia 2.

My friend DM who lives in England posted this on his Facebook page:

“We went for a walk this p.m. and were reminiscing…. got to comparing our childhood with “These days”…. We came up with a list of things that were not available to we mere mortals back in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s….
Aubergines
Papayas,
Chinese Gooseberries (now called Kiwi Fruit)
Kumquats
Lychees
(all sorts of things…)
Funny how I can recall the fruit..
So…. what didn’t you have when you were growing up? What was only available in tins (cans)?”

I had responded with:
“The only thing that I remember coming out of a can was a cooking medium called Dalda. Everything else was bought and consumed with hardly anything being stored other than rice, pulses and flour. We did not have refrigerators. So everything perishable was bought at need and used up immediately.”

And DM’s response was simply mindblowing and brought back other memories with which many of my regular readers will connect.

“My parents bought their first ‘fridge in (about) 1958. The mechanism started to leak gas two days after the warranty expired….. other wise we had a stone shelved larder in most of the cottages we lived in.

A lot of foodstuffs were preserved by bottling (canning), beans were salted …. we even salted runner beans in the 1970s when we were first married….other tricks were used… eggs were preserved in isinglass (from sturgeons’ swim bladders) and milk was kept cool buy dint of evaporating water from a cloth covering the bottle or can.
We were never rich enough to afford the land to build an ice house…

 

To reflect back on those days without refrigerators and other modern conveniences has been quite a nostalgic trip. It took me to many other thoughts some of which can be found in this blog post.”

Gone Fishing.

My friend SG had this to say on his Facebook post: “This is probably a sure sign that I am getting old, but I absolutely love “Gone Fishing” with Bob Mortimer and Paul Whitehouse. Stunning locations, gentle banter and great fishing – what’s not to like?”

That took me back to the early nineties of the last century and Chris Rea.

I posted this in response to SG and we then exchanged the following messages.

SG: Please watch the programme if you can. It is on BBC 2 here, I think. It is hosted by two aging comedians in their early 60s who are recovering from life threatening health conditions, so a lot of meditations on life and mortality (all presented in a light-hearted way).

I: I have seen a few clips on youtube recommended by some friends. Quite interesting but, not my cup of tea. I am not as old as you are.

(There is over two decades of age difference between us.)

For those interested, the lyrics for Chris Rea’s song:

I’m going fishing
I got me a line
Nothin’ I do’s gonna’ make the difference
So I’m taking the time
And you ain’t never gonna’ be happy
Anyhow, anyway
So I’m going fishing
And I’m going today
I’m going fishing
Sounds crasy I know
I know nothing about fishing
But just watch me go
And when my time has come
I will look back and see
Peace on the shoreline
That could have been me
You can waste whole lifetime
Trying to be
What you think is expected of you
But you’ll never be free
May as well go fishing.

Chris Rea interview – summer 1991, for the song ”Gone Fishing”.

“I know a lot of people have remarked to me they have listened to the record, “I like that song, that’s what we should do, just go fishing, forget about everything”. The funny thing about that song is as I say in the song, I don’t know anything about fishing. he bottom line of the tune is that when you get to the last day of your life and you look back, and you see how many hours you’ve spent in traffic-jams, pushing and shoving, how many hours you’ve spent elbowing people out of the way and being elbowed out of the way; You just thing to yourself I wish I had all them hours back, cos I may as well have gone fishing…”

Hard Life.

An exchange of messages on Facebook between me and my good friend Rajinder.

Rajinder Kumar Sharma

This life’s hard but it’s easy if you’re stupid

Ramana Rajgopaul
It is very easy for me Rajinder. I leave the rest to your imagination.

Rajinder Kumar Sharma
Ramana Rajgopaul I talk about humans and not about Mahatmas.
Pranam.

Ramana Rajgopaul
You know what would have happened had you been within arm’s reach don’t you?

Rajinder Kumar Sharma.

I would have hugged you.

———————————————————–

Another friend BKK sent me a message on WhatsApp and asked me why I had left fb.

(I had left a WhatsApp group in which both BKK and I were members.)

I responded that I am still on fb.

He is too embarrassed over his goof to respond. I however hope that he does so that I can have some more fun.

Model And The Original.

My irrepressible nephew Jai posted this in Facebook.

“I bought a miniature 1952 Citroen – here it is alongside a snap of the real thing starring miniature versions of my three uncles.

The 1952 Citroen was a favourite of my father and uncle. My childhood friend Vela too was very fond of it and had one for many years. I still remember driving his car, trying to shift the gear shift on the dashboard with the handle coming off in my hands.

Siblings.

For some strange reason, my sister posted this on Facebook.

And she added as comments: “Yes…in our family…though mind you…he did sow some pretty wild oats in his heyday. Today, he is a sanyasi and we in the family and a host of other people from all walks of life admire and count upon him as their mentor…to my mother Anusuya’s first born Ramana Rajgopaul. And coming to the tail of this tale…the youngest are spoilt, stubborn and opinionated…ask me…I should know myself, right!”

Not being a modest fellow, I could not agree more. The image however should be reversed in our case, the eldest is a male, me and the youngest is a female, my sister. In between there were two males, one of them sadly no more. Now you can understand her comments about the youngest.

I would like to add this image to conclude this narration.

The truth of the matter however is that they stopped because finally they got the daughter they wanted. I used to tease my late younger brother that had he been a daughter, we would have been just two!  It however turned that the last one also turned out to be the perfect child.

Perception.

My friend Sathya posted this on Facebook.

This reminded me of a post that I wrote here almost ten years ago.

The link will take you to the blog post but, the images there have been taken down to save space. Here is an image of the Indian Mock Strawberry flower.

This flower continues to pop up every  morning now  in our garden without any deliberate planting or tending. Remarkably resilient plant!

I think that Sathya will vouch for the fact that I am a joyful person as she is too!