Nostalgia 6. Badge Of Honour.

My regular readers will be aware of one of my physical limitations that has bothered me for a dozen years now. It is called Right Ulnar Palsy and it makes it difficult for me to hold things tightly in my right hand. This caused two problems for me earlier today and the second one is this.

That is me with a stained white t-shirt unable to take a better selfie with my right hand.

The first one was what caused the yellow stains in the first place. I was eating mangoes as dessert for lunch. Since our cook was off on holiday today, our char cut the mangoes. Had the cook been there, she would have cut the mangoes without the skin and the stone completely scraped off and I could have simply had the fruit from a bowl using a spoon.

With the mangoes cut differently, I had to eat the mangoes like this:

After seeing the first slice being eaten if you go to 1.40 minutes, you will see how the flesh from the stone is consumed.

My ulnar palsy played up and the stone slipped out of my hand and fell on my t-shirt. That is the stain that you see on the first image.

Why nostalgia?

During my school days, as soon as the mango season started, the first classmate with a stained vest under the uniform shirt was given a badge of honour by the rest of the class. One of course had to deliberately stain the vest to earn this badge! I never did get the badge of honour though as, I could not afford to get the vest stained for fear of punishment from a martinet for a father!

Have you had some mangoes lately? How did you eat them?

Nostalgia 5.

My daughter in love went shopping for vegetables yesterday and saw freshly arrived ground nuts, called peanuts by the Americans, and knowing my weakness for it, bought a pile of it.

I got it steamed in a pressure cooker and sat down to shell them.

That is when nostalgia kicked in taking me back to my childhood when my mother used to ask the four of us siblings to shell the nuts. We used to call that a picnic as, while shelling for storage, we used to keep popping some as we went along. I did not pop any while I shelled because I am still recovering from a tooth extraction but, am looking forward to doing so soon enough from the shelled and refrigerated stock.
Apart from the picnic nostalgia another memory of a late friend kept coming up. That of VB, a dear friend who used to get the snacks for our parties. He used to specially get these boiled groundnuts for me and inevitably say, “Nuts for a nut from a nut!” It has been a long time since I remembered him.
Here is a stock photograph from Alamy showing Indian village children having a picnic like we used to have in our childhood.

How do you like your ground/peanuts?

Food, Exotic Sweets.

For those of you who do not know, I am an Indian with roots in Tamil Nadu. Yesterday was Tamil New Year Day. Rather than go through the hassles of making a traditional sweet to bring in the new year, I decided to get something that my daughter in love would not have ever had before. Since my late wife had her roots in Andhra Pradesh, I decided to get something that she had liked very much and had ordered for it well in time.  The goodies came from a village called Atreyapuram and are called Putharekulu.
The rolls that you see inside are not tissue paper but, look like it.  They are sheets made out of rice and this video will show how it is done.

The version that I procured contains different types of sweet stuffing and one of them exclusively dry fruits.

Incidentally, as I write this, it is Bengali New Year. My daughter in love is half Bengali and half Maharashtrian. The Bengali half, her mother, is with us to celebrate both the new years. She in turn has made a traditional milk / vermicelli sweet dish called Payesh for the occasion.

These are the most satisfying treats that I am having after a very long time. Brings back many memories including one of actually seeing and helping in making putharekulu being made at my late wife’s maternal home. And the Payesh is the icing on the cake too! Total bliss.

Food And Humour.

In Nick’s post Food For Thought I had commented as “By now you would have gathered from my blog posts on food that I simply follow my instincts and do not bother about the quality of the food or its nutritional value.”

The Japanese keep surprising me with their language and humour. Two days later, I received this image in my WhatsApp page.

A day later, as though to bring me down to earth, I received this image in WhatsApp.

What a journey!

Where do you fit in such a ladder? The first, second or the last image?

Food Again! Moong Dal Pakode.

This image is doing the WhatsApp rounds over here with the caption “Mumbai variant called Pakodacron has arrived.”
This is a spoof on the Covid Epsilon Variant as shown below.

I thought that the pakodacron was quite creative and funny. I also went down memory lane to my Mumbai days when near the shops of my main dealers, a snack bar on the platform of a suburban railway station called Masjid specialised in freshly made hot Moong Dal Pakode. This used to be sent for to accompany cups of hot chai during discussions.
The treat was not served like the image above in nice  dishes but came wrapped in old newspapers and were accompanied by green chillies dipped in lime juice and coated with salt.

Remembering this old treat I have decided to get them made at home tomorrow just to go on a nostalgia trip.

Does the pandemic situation give raise to such developments for you too?

Memory And Food.

A facebook post showed this image and asked if the reader had ever had it.
I responded that I had indeed had and would like to have it again if I could lay my hands on some.

Having posted that, I just could not recall the name for the sweet to send for and so posted the image on some WhatsApp pages of local friends and asked for its name and where I could get it.

I got two responses and typically for Pune, one gave me a name popular in the Old City and the other, the name popular among a particular type of vendors. I discovered that the latter is more popular and that it is Goad Kandi Shev.

While I was going through all the above adventure, I also remembered a similar sweet being made at home and again, no matter how hard I tried and googled for it, could not get the name. So, I took the help of WhatsApp again and sent to my sister and a childhood friend who too promptly sent me the name Manogaram. There is a family in Chennai who make many South Indian preparations at home and offer them online and I ordered for two packets of the same which came earlier today.
It is made of different material but my readers should be able to see why I was reminded of it because of its shape.

The Online shop offering this is named Sweet Karam Coffee.  Karam is pronounced Kaaram, and means savoury. Whenever the mood takes me, I get some snacks from them and I recommend them to all my friends too.

Do you have such memory failures on names of food?