Modern Democracy–Success Or Failure.

I think that the question is unanswerable in its present form. In my not so humble opinion, it is neither. It is a joke.  I am one of those who enjoy the process and see humour in it instead of getting worked up about the outcomes.

The winning side always faces criticism from the losing side which blames everything else under the sun other than its own shortcomings for its loss.  The losing side is lampooned by all kinds of pundits for being incapable of taking on the winning side.

This is more than amply illustrated by the joke that has been doing the social media rounds the last few weeks. “The USA has now realised that it is easier to get rid of foreign presidents than their own.”

There are other countries which, after election results are announced claim that the candidate has been selected and not elected.

And others where the whole world knows that the elections are rigged but, they are held nevertheless and the winner hailed.

The oldest democracy and the largest democracy in the world recently had two elections almost at the same time. The former to elect its President and the latter to bring in a new legislature and government to a large state.

Both had one significant thing in common. The losers refused to accept their losses and the following two cartoons say more than I could ever say.

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In the lower cartoon, Tejaswi Yadav the loser in India’s Bihar is blaming Rahul Gandhi whose party and the former’s party jointly fought the elections together against the winning combination. The text says – “What sanitiser have you used that victory slipped away from our hands?”

I do not wish to say anything more about the American democracy but, will about the Indian one.  To start with let me reproduce a quote from Winston Churchill.  “If independence is granted to India Power will go to the hands of rascals, rogues, freebooters; all Indian leaders will be of low calibre & men of straw. They will have sweet tongues and silly hearts. They will fight amongst themselves for power and India will be lost in political squabbles.”

This was during a debate in the British parliament in 1947.  Since then a lot of water has flowed down the Thames and India has survived for over 77 years as a  democracy  except for a short aberration between 1975 and 1977. It has had its share of heroes and villains like all the other democracies of the world.

I quote a bit from a incisive article by an eminent writer of India – “In popular Western narrative, India wasn’t expected to make it in one piece, much less emerge as the world’s fifth largest economy.”

In the meanwhile, it is interesting to note that Britain, the so called mother of democracies is supposed to be facing a crisis of democracy!

Do you now see why I think that democracy is a joke?

This is my contribution to this week’s Friday 8 On 1 blog post topic. The other seven bloggers who write on the same topic every Friday are Maria. Sanjana, PadmumRaju, Shackman , Srinivas and Conrad.  This week’s topic was suggested by Raju. Please do go over to their respective blogs to see what they have to say on the topic. Thank you.

Letter to Santa. What I want for Christmas.

There is an affectionate term in Term called Mundirikottai which means Cashew nut. A cashew fruit while still unplucked from the tree looks like this:

Do you get why I introduce it here and what relevance it has to the topic? Unlikely, possibly with the exception of Padmum who has suggested this topic for today, and / or Sanjana who speaks Tamil at home.

In Tamil ‘ mundiri’ means cashew and means a nut; So it is ‘ mundirikottai’

A nut or seed is formed inside a vegetable or fruit in the middle of edible flesh by nature, not visible outside except in the case of cashew.

Only cashew has this peculiar formation of the nut protruding outside of it and is visible.

Hence any person who tries to make his/her presence felt first ignoring others is called ‘mundirikottai’

For example, you ask a question addressed to the person ‘A’ in a group, expecting an answer from him/ her only. But the person ‘B’ comes forward suddenly/immediately to answer and answers even before the person ‘A’ starts to answer ‘B’ is rightly called ‘Mundirikottai.’

Now, I can call Padmum a cashew nut for wanting to write to Santa Claus in the beginning of November or call myself one for writing this letter to him much ahead of all the other letters that he will surely get from mid December onwards. The chances of his forgetting my requests are more if I write now but, perhaps that is what Padmini wants him to do any way.  Padmum however qualifies for this title as she has posted one day ahead of the scheduled Friday.  I think that she is desperate for her list to be studied in detail by Santa before he gets other lists.

I have reached the stage of life where my wants are none and needs are few. I have been blessed with everything that I need to live my remaining life span in reasonable comfort and so my letter to Santa this year will ask for just the following.

1. Please ensure that I and mine are spared the chinese virus.
2. Please ensure that the virus disappears quickly.
3. Please ensure that all beings experience good health, peace and joy.

And to wind up, a little humour.

This is my contribution to this week’s Friday 8 On 1 blog post topic. The other seven bloggers who write on the same topic every Friday are Maria. Sanjana, PadmumRaju, Shackman , Srinivas and Conrad.  This week’s topic was suggested by Padmum. Please do go over to their respective blogs to see what they have to say on the topic. Thank you.