RAIN.

A dear friend sent this link to me which I found to be interesting and topical enough to share with my readers. Dr. Sandeep Kelkar is a practicing paediatrician in Thane. a town very near Mumbai. He has had considerable experience handling parents and this approach obviously is something that he has developed to destress his patients’ parents. This is as applicable to us as to parents of children.

Pune Yesterday.

This is a drone camera clip of Pune yesterday when we went into voluntary total curfew following an appeal from our Prime Minister.

From today till the 31st of March, the curfew like situation will no longer be voluntary. We have to stay indoors except for emergencies.

There is no traffic and therefore one can now hear the sound of insects and cicadas that we had stopped hearing for decades. The air is cleaner and last night, we could see the stars for a change. we can hear the birds sing and our garden is suddenly full of butterflies.

I am catching up with a lot of reading after my regular dose of solving crossword puzzles. Thankfully, the news papers have not been stopped from publishing and delivering papers to homes.

I have a feeling, shared by many of my friends that after this drama’s curtains come down, may be even after a few months, our lives will be of a different nature than they have been over the past few decades.

Much Ado About Nothing.

KAKVI is a dark, thick liquid extracted during the process of refining sugar cane into table sugar. KAKVI is obtained during the third boiling of the cane syrup and contains a unique concentration of many important vitamins and minerals left over after the sugar’s sucrose is crystallized. I use this instead of sugar.

I ordered two bottles of kakvi online after visiting this page.

I received a carton weighing about three kilograms containing two tiny bottles. Most of the carton contained bubble wraps and some cardboard fillers. Agreed that the glass bottles needed to be protected so that they don’t break in transit but, this, in my opinion is over kill.

What packaging!

The Supernatural.

supernatural
adjective

caused by forces that cannot be explained by science:
Ghosts and evil spirits are supernatural.
She is said to have supernatural powers and to be able to communicate with the dead.
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This Friday’s Two On One topic has been chosen by Shackman who perhaps has been influenced by the highly popular television serial of the same name!  I have never seen it nor have any intention of seeing it in the future.

I personally have no experience of the supernatural nor have I met anyone who has had one.  I have heard vague stories without any proof and have never taken the subject seriously except once in the Southern State of Kerala, when after an evening of swapping stories at a club’s bar up in the Munnar Hills, on a dare I spent a night in the verandah of an abandoned bungalow which was reputed to be haunted.

I slept blissfully without even a dream and woke up with a hangover, not due to any supernatural forces but due to the previous evenings excess. I proved to the sceptics among my hosts that the haunted story must have been planted by someone interested in the real estate and since nothing happened to me, perhaps, they should have a good strong look at what is the story behind the rumours and beliefs.

Having shared that piece of my experience, let me conclude this post by saying that since I have neither belief nor personal experience of any supernatural phenomenon, I have nothing further to say in the matter.

I am sure that Shackman will have something/s more interesting to say and request my readers to go over to his blog to read that.

Justice.

A few days ago, a friend posted the following joke in one the WhatsApp groups to which I belong.

“A 75 year old man was punished by an Indian court for teasing a girl.

While delivering the judgement, the Judge said “I can understand a 25 year old man teasing a girl but, a 75 year old man doing this is not acceptable.”

The old man said “I did this when I was 25, the case has taken so long to come to this stage of final hearing and verdict.”

The Guardian on Sunday 26, January had an article with the leader “Crime victims say they feel ‘let down’ by the courts and police as new data reveals rising numbers are failing to press charges.”

A few more jokes to cheer my readers up before I come to my take on the topic.

Indian courts are understaffed and over worked and so the justice system works too slow for most people with disputes. I have personal experience of such delays on more than a few occasions, one, very personal and the others to do with corporate matters during my working life.  The Cooperative Housing Society in which I live is currently involved in a long drawn litigation with one member who has broken all rules of the society but is unwilling to settle otherwise.  There are friends who have been in court for decades over property matters that do not seen to ever see conclusions.

Wikipedia has a long list of miscarriage of justice which, to say the least, is shocking.

“Time is the justice that examines all offenders.”

~ Shakespeare in “As You Like It”

This week’s topic for the Two On One Friday Blog Post has been suggested by me.  Please do go over to Shackman’s blog to see what he has to say on the matter.

Satisfaction.

This post has been inspired by a story narrated by a character in a fascinating book about Banaras, or Varanasi as it is now known.

“After breakfast I go go my shop. It is a grocery shop run by my two sons,. The oldest and the youngest. I have three sons. The one in the middle is a lawyer. Our financial troubles are behind us now, I am a happy man. But I was a happy even during the difficult days because I was always satisfied with whatever little I had. I never asked anyone for favours. Satisfaction is the most important thing in life. If you have satisfaction, you have everything.”

This character is a man that the author meets in an akhara. He is a retired old man who had come up the hard way as many characters in the book do. Like him, the others in the book too come across as satisfied people who enjoy living in Banaras and the author goes on to say this finding of his too.

“That’s my takeaway message from this trip to Banaras: satisfaction is everything. All these days I was rubbing shoulders with sadhus on the ghats, but finally, on the day of my departure, I have come across a sage, that too in a gym.”

Varanasi has always fascinated me and I have written one story about my own experience there in one of my blogs. I have also reviewed a film Masan a story located in Varanasi, in my blog.

While the author  Bishwanath Gosh, was impressed by the Banarasi’s satisfaction quotient, I think that he has missed out on the macro picture of the satisfaction levels of most Indians.  Having travelled across the length and breadth of this country during my working days, and a garulous one easily chatting with strangers, I can vouch for the fact that it is a remarkable attitude of most Indians to be satisfied with their lot in life.  For instance, I am sure that it does not come as a surprise to my readers, I for one am a very satisfied person.  I do not envy others more wealthy or healthy as, I am quite content with what I have and what I have become.  Almost all of my friends and family members are like me and many foreigners have observed this trait and commented negatively as being stoic or unambitious.  I think that Bishwanath Ghosh has found the correct description of this trait as being satisfied with one’s lot.

I think that this is what the great American sports personality meant when he said:

“The measure of who we are is,  what we do with what we have.”

~ Vince Lombardi.

Please do go over to Shackman’s blog to see what he has to say about this same topic.