Monsoon Season.

In my post Favourite Time Of The Year I had indicated that it was the monsoon season.

Here is a short clip that shows some excellent scenes from the state where I live, Maharashtra. I can take you to places like this within fifty kms from my residence during the monsoon season.

I wish that I knew the cameraman’s name to give him credit for this excellent work through Camera Drone. I however thank my friend Hari for sending me this clip that brings back so many memories for me.

The Climate In My Hometown.

l live in Pune, a city located to the East of Mumbai the more famous city, in the state of Maharashtra, which is located on the Western part of India. It is situated 560 metres (1,837 feet) above median sea level on the Deccan Plateau.

The climate here was balmy enough for the British to locate their largest Command Headquarters of the then British empire here.  It continues to be Free India’s too.

Pune has a hot semi-arid climate (BSh) bordering with tropical wet and dry (Aw) with average temperatures ranging between 20 to 28 °C (68 to 82 °F).

Pune experiences three seasons: summer, monsoon, and winter.

Typical summer months are from March to May, with maximum temperatures ranging from 30 to 38 °C (86 to 100 °F). The warmest month in Pune is April; although summer doesn’t end until May, the city often receives heavy thundershowers in May (and humidity remains high). Even during the hottest months, the nights are usually cool due to Pune’s high altitude. The highest temperature ever recorded was 42.3 °C (108.1 °F) on 30 April 1897.

The monsoon lasts from June to October, with moderate rainfall and temperatures ranging from 22 to 28 °C (72 to 82 °F). Most of the 722 mm (28.43 in) of annual rainfall in the city falls between June and September, and July is the wettest month of the year. Hailstorms are also common in this region.

Winter begins in November; November in particular is referred to as the Rosy Cold (literal translation) (Marathi: गुलाबी थंडी). The daytime temperature hovers around 28 °C (82 °F) while night temperature is below 10 °C (50 °F) for most of December and January, often dropping to 5 to 6 °C (41 to 43 °F). The lowest temperature ever recorded was 1.7 °C (35 °F) on 17 January 1935.

I was born in what was then Bombay and  have many relatives and friends there. After marriage too, I was posted there on three separate occasions when living was much easier and less stressful than how it is now.

My late wife was from Hyderabad and we always drove to Hyderabad from Mumbai on holidays and had to pass through Pune and always admired the city and its laid back style besides its climate.  We wanted to retire to Pune as a compromise between Bombay and Hyderabad and that is exactly what we did eventually.

I have now lived in Pune for 25 years and would not like to live anywhere else and the single most important reason for it, is its climate.

This topic was also suggested by me, for the weekly Friday Loose Bloggers Consortium where currently nine of us write on the same topic every Friday.  I hope that you enjoyed my contribution to that effort.  The seven other bloggers who write regularly are, in alphabetical order,  AshokgaelikaaLin, Maxi, Padmum, Pravin,  Shackman and The Old Fossil. Do drop in on their blogs and see what their take is on this week’s topic. Since some of them may post late, or not at all this week, do give some allowance for that too!

Back Home.

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I returned to Pune yesterday to be greeted with delightful monsoon weather and rain with very comfortable cool air. Coming as I did from Chennai where it was hot, humid and muggy, it was a relief. I was greeted with the sight of our river Mulamutha in spate as you can see from the photograph taken by my friend Susan.

From the time I came till now as I write 24 hours later, it has not stopped raining. We are informed that the deficit that we experienced in June and early July has been wiped out and we will not have any water shortages for yet another year running. Truly a blessing. Our reservoirs are either full or rapidly getting there and since August also promises to be good as far as rainfall is concerned, it augurs well for the next twelve months.

Not everything around us is good news however. We have had a tragedy yesterday at a very scenic place due to a landslide. The price ignorant people pay for deforestation. There are likely to be more such stories from other parts of the state.

In our neighbouring state Gujarat, things have been very interesting indeed!

So like every monsoon, some bad news among generally good news and I for one am delighted to be back where I am most comfortable. So, with apologies to Robert Louis Stevenson let me conclude:

Here I am back where I long’d to be;
 
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
 
And the hunter home from the hill.
 
 

A New Friend.

The star of that show is Parag Kanhere who is a Television Celebrity Chef who regularly appears in Marathi(the local language of the state we live in, Maharashtra) cookery shows.

Last week when we had gone out to celebrate our freedom, my sister Padmini, son Ranjan and his friend Manjiri decided to go to a new restaurant in our neighbourhood called CANDYZ BISTRO. To cut a long story short, we had a grand evening out and had some truly delicious food specially hustled up for us by the Chef personally. That Chef is Parag Kanhere and he is also the owner of the bistro. This is a photo of Parag taken while he was suggesting our meal.

Here is the leaflet that I picked up on my way out. Please click on the image to enlarge it.

Parag was most engaging and pleasant and his recommendations turned out to be just what would appeal to four different tastes. At the end of the meal, I had promised to blog about our visit to his restaurant to Parag and am just finding the time to do so.

Parag, I hope that you are reading this. All four of us thoroughly enjoyed your hospitality and wish you all success in this new venture. You can expect us repeatedly back again at Candyz.